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Rosemary Health Benefits, Nutritional Value and Uses

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What is Rosemary?

Rosemary is an aromatic member of the mint family native to the Mediterranean region where it is utilized as a treasured culinary spice. It is a flowering evergreen, producing thin, needle-like leaves which are harvested for food or medicine. Rosemary plants are commonly cultivated and easily grown in many household gardens. They can grow prolifically and prefer full sun and well-drained soil, but can also thrive in pots on the windowsill.

There are many cultivators of rosemary worldwide, each with unique growth and flowering characteristics. Nevertheless, the flavor of rosemary is not highly variable and makes an excellent addition to many traditional dishes.

Rosemary is an aromatic member of the mint family native to the Mediterranean region where it is utilized as a treasured culinary spice.

Health Benefits of Rosemary

Antibacterial Potential: While the general immune boosting qualities of rosemary are impressive enough, it is specifically powerful against bacterial infections, particularly those in the stomach. H. pylori bacteria is a common and very dangerous pathogen that can cause stomach ulcers, but rosemary has been shown to prevent its growth when consumed. Similarly, rosemary is linked to preventing Staph infections, which kill thousands of people each year.

Stomach Soother: Rosemary has traditionally been used by dozens of cultures as a natural remedy for upset stomachs, constipation, bloating, diarrhea, and everything in between. Its anti-inflammatory and stimulant effects are largely the cause of these effects, so adding rosemary to your weekly diet can quickly help you regulate your bowel movements and your gastrointestinal system.


Breath Freshener:
As a natural antibacterial agent, rosemary works as a wonderful breath freshener that also improves your oral health. Steep rosemary leaves in a glass of hot water and then gargle or swish the water in your mouth to eliminate bacteria and give you naturally fresh and clean breath all night!

Stimulate Blood Flow:
Rosemary acts as a stimulant for the body and boosts the production of red blood cells and blood flow. This helps to oxygenate vital organ systems and areas of the body, ensuring that the metabolic activities in those areas are running smoothly, in addition to stimulating the movement of nutrients to cells that require repair.

Memory Booster:
One of the earliest reported or documented uses of rosemary for health reasons was as a cognitive stimulant. It was said to improve memory and help to increase intelligence and focus. While many of those claims are still being researched and studied, its effects on the brain do indicate an increase in memory retention, which is never a bad thing; keeping your mind quick will help to keep it young. In that same vein, rosemary has been linked to stimulating cognitive activity in the elderly, as well as those suffering from more acute cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer’s or dementia. This is an exciting alternative or supplement to more modern treatment for these as yet uncured conditions.
Detoxify the Body: Rosemary is slightly diuretic in nature, meaning that it can help flush out toxins more efficiently during urination. Furthermore, by increasing the rate at which water leaves the body, it can also help push out pathogens, salts, toxins, and even excess fat when consumed regularly (or when you’re feeling particularly “toxified”). In terms of the particular organ it benefits, rosemary has been linked to lower levels of cirrhosis and a faster healing time of the liver, which is one of the slowest organs to heal.

Skin Health: The anti-aging properties of rosemary are quite well known. Although more commonly thought of in the essential oil form, the leaves of rosemary can also effect the skin internally or topically, and has been shown to improve the youthful quality of the skin, while also healing blemishes and increasing the natural shine and hydrated appearance of your body’s largest organ.Mood and Stress: The aroma of rosemary alone has been linked to improving mood, clearing the mind, and relieving stress in those with chronic anxiety or stress hormone imbalances. When the plant is consumed or applied topically in some sort of salve of the leaves, it can have similar effects. Aromatherapy also uses rosemary essential oil for this purpose, but that concentration of active components isn’t necessary to have positive effects on stress and mood.

Immune System Strength:
The active components in rosemary are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic in nature. This represents a three-pronged attack against many different diseases and pathogens that could threaten the immune system or damage the integrity of the body. Antioxidant compounds form a secondary line of defense behind the body’s own immune system, and rosemary contains a significant amount of those powerful compounds, including rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, betulic acid, and carnosol.

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Uses of Rosemary

Rosemary is an herb. Oil is extracted from the leaf and used to make medicine

Dried leaf: Teas and tinctures, however it is most popularly used in cooking.The essential oil is used in aromatherapy but should not be taken internally. Rosemary is used topically (applied to the skin) for preventing and treating baldness; and treating circulation problems, toothache, a skin condition called eczema, and joint or muscle pain such as myalgia, sciatica, and intercostal neuralgia. It is also used for wound healing, in bath therapy (balneotherapy), and as an insect repellent.

Nutritional value of Rosemary

Having an antioxidant ORAC value of 3,300, rosemary has the same free radical fighting power as goji berries! The chemical in rosemary primarily responsible for this is carnosol, a phenolic diterpene also found in mountain desert sage.

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Rosemary constituents: 1,8-cineole, acetic acid, camphor, carnosol, carvacrol, carvone, caryophyllene, chlorogenic acid, geraniol, hesperidin, limonene, luteolin, rosmarinic acid, salicylates.